Save the Date-2014

The Conclave Of Richmond Pipe Smokers, C.O.R.P.S. (pronounced “CORE” like the Marine Corps), is a non-profit organization, founded for its members and the public to learn about and enjoy the Ancient & Honorable Art & Sport of Pipe Smoking; and to educate and communicate all positive aspects thereof. We also, as much as possible, support Richmond area children’s charities with funds beyond our operating expenses. Membership is open to any person or organization interested in any aspect of the Art & Sport. A dues or sponsorship payment is required (currently $25 per year for individuals).

We meet monthly in a social meeting, with some limited business,  to enjoy one another’s company for dinner, drink and sharing our love of pipes and tobaccos.  The meetings are usually held on the third Tuesday of the month, but the day, time and location will vary. See below for the location of the next meeting.  An irregular newsletter is issued, which provides meeting info, hobby happenings, literature, art and the like.

We also host THE annual Pipe Smokers’ Exposition & Celebration, which is celebrating its 30th year this coming October 10-12, 2014! Same Place, Same time.  Click here to find out more and to join us!  Please visit our 30th. EXPO Highlights page for details and photos.

The 30th. EXPO will again be at the Richmond Convention Center, (YES. WE CAN SMOKE IN THE CONVENTION CENTER)…lodging arrangements have not been finalized at this time, but we are working on it. CHECK BACK.

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RIGHT UNDER OUR NOSE AT THE PAST EXPO…Leafy Sea Dragon pipe by Tonni Neilsen from Neill Archer Roan (A Passion For Pipes)

While there are many notable pipe collections in our pipe community, Richard Friedman’s Sea Creature collection is unique among them. Taking its inspiration from Richard’s life at sea, his collection is populated with a vast array of ocean creatures—some so exotic and other-worldly that it boggles the mind that their essential shapes or natures could be imagined, let alone rendered, in briar.

Leafy Sea Dragon While some shapes, like the blowfish, fugu, and whale, have made their way into the mainstream, others like the manta ray, the sea horse, the squid or the octopus will almost certainly never become commonplace. Among these rarities, one in particular stands out: a Leafy Sea Dragon by Tonni Nielsen that Richard acquired at the last Richmond Pipe Show.

Sea Creature collector Richard Friedman I was present when Richard first saw this pipe. When he handed it to me for my inspection, I was astonished. I did not so much examine the pipe as try to keep it from wriggling from my grasp. Most of all, I was struck by its dynamism. I have never seen such a complex shape that made such masterful use of the medium from which it was crafted. Tonni’s placement of plateau, planes, ridges, and curves simultaneously reveals the best of what the block had to offer while endowing the shape with such flexing muscularity that the pipe seems more than organically inspired. It seems alive. It’s contours suggest that DNA made it, not Tonni Nielsen.

Attending as many pipe shows and visiting as many collectors as I do, I see a lot of pipes. This is a good thing and a bad thing. It is good because comparison and contrast with a large array of work trains the eye and hones the sensibilities. It is bad because one sees far more middling than excellent work. This cannot help but be the case because not every artisan is equally gifted.

As the artisan population has grown, there are more and more very skilled wood-crafters out there. As the overall technical level has risen, the fit and finish levels of what is offered has made it difficult to differentiate one artisan from another, especially in technical terms.

What matters to me most, however, is aesthetics. I am jaded because I have seen far too many perfect pipes lacking in beauty. I have seen very few pipes that approach the mastery evidenced in this creation. This is among the two or three most exquisite creations in briar I have ever seen. It fulfills all the criteria I ascribe to a masterpiece, and I do not use this word lightly. I examined this pipe for five days—including photographing it— and I never ceased marveling. Not for one second.

The most remarkable quality of the pipe concerns its movement dynamics. Depending on one’s angle-of-view, the pipe seems variously moving or at rest. From one vantage point, the leafy sea dragon seems asleep, camouflaged by the ocean flora in which it had nestled itself. From other perspectives, it seems captured mid-dart, avoiding some peckish predator.

I can imagine the inner musings of some of you as you read this. You are billiard or dublin smokers. Your idea of an adventurous shape is a bulldog. “That’s weird,” or “That’s not a pipe, that’s a sculpture,” is riffing through your thoughts now, assuming you’ve even read this far. I can relate. I possess fairly conservative pipe-shape preferences, myself. One’s tastes, however, are beside the point. Like Bo Nordh’s ballerina or Ramses, this pipe inverts the landscape. I will never see innovations in shaping the same way again after having interacted with this Leafy Sea Dragon.

Artisan Tonni Nielsen Because I spent so much time with Tonni at the show, I also had hours to talk with him about the pipe: why he made it, what he tried to accomplish, what his challenges were, and how he went about trying to solve them.

I will be frank with you here. Having visually scrubbed this pipe for hours for any flaws or deficits, it became increasingly apparent to me that the principal quality required of this pipe’s creator had to have been insanity. Just the finish-sanding—don’t even consider the shape-sanding—had to have required tens of hours, something that Tonni confirmed. “I thought I was in sanding purgatory,” he quipped in his understated Danish humor.

This pipe was made on spec. As Tonni sweated through its creation, he had no buyer. While he made the pipe with Richard in mind, there were no guarantees. And as the hours mounted while Tonni pushed the envelope—challenging his own limitations as well as the briar’s—the entire effort could have come to nothing with the emergence of a flaw. This sort of endeavor is a high-wire walk in a place where the wind can suddenly gust without warning. It is not for the inexperienced, the gutless, or the artisan who values cost-efficiencies over making great work.

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Save the Date-2014

The Conclave Of Richmond Pipe Smokers, C.O.R.P.S. (pronounced “CORE” like the Marine Corps), is a non-profit organization, founded for its members and the public to learn about and enjoy the Ancient & Honorable Art & Sport of Pipe Smoking; and to educate and communicate all positive aspects thereof. We also, as much as possible, support Richmond area children’s charities with funds beyond our operating expenses. Membership is open to any person or organization interested in any aspect of the Art & Sport. A dues or sponsorship payment is required (currently $25 per year for individuals).

We meet monthly in a social meeting, with some limited business,  to enjoy one another’s company for dinner, drink and sharing our love of pipes and tobaccos.  The meetings are usually held on the third Tuesday of the month, but the day, time and location will vary. See below for the location of the next meeting.  An irregular newsletter is issued, which provides meeting info, hobby happenings, literature, art and the like.

We also host THE annual Pipe Smokers’ Exposition & Celebration, which is celebrating its 30th year this coming October 10-12, 2014! Same Place, Same time.  Click here to find out more and to join us!  Please visit our 30th. EXPO Highlights page for details and photos.

The 30th. EXPO will again be at the Richmond Convention Center, (YES. WE CAN SMOKE IN THE CONVENTION CENTER)…lodging arrangements have not been finalized at this time, but we are working on it. CHECK BACK.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
RIGHT UNDER OUR NOSE AT THE PAST EXPO…Leafy Sea Dragon pipe by Tonni Neilsen from Neill Archer Roan (A Passion For Pipes)

While there are many notable pipe collections in our pipe community, Richard Friedman’s Sea Creature collection is unique among them. Taking its inspiration from Richard’s life at sea, his collection is populated with a vast array of ocean creatures—some so exotic and other-worldly that it boggles the mind that their essential shapes or natures could be imagined, let alone rendered, in briar.

Leafy Sea Dragon While some shapes, like the blowfish, fugu, and whale, have made their way into the mainstream, others like the manta ray, the sea horse, the squid or the octopus will almost certainly never become commonplace. Among these rarities, one in particular stands out: a Leafy Sea Dragon by Tonni Nielsen that Richard acquired at the last Richmond Pipe Show.

Sea Creature collector Richard Friedman I was present when Richard first saw this pipe. When he handed it to me for my inspection, I was astonished. I did not so much examine the pipe as try to keep it from wriggling from my grasp. Most of all, I was struck by its dynamism. I have never seen such a complex shape that made such masterful use of the medium from which it was crafted. Tonni’s placement of plateau, planes, ridges, and curves simultaneously reveals the best of what the block had to offer while endowing the shape with such flexing muscularity that the pipe seems more than organically inspired. It seems alive. It’s contours suggest that DNA made it, not Tonni Nielsen.

Attending as many pipe shows and visiting as many collectors as I do, I see a lot of pipes. This is a good thing and a bad thing. It is good because comparison and contrast with a large array of work trains the eye and hones the sensibilities. It is bad because one sees far more middling than excellent work. This cannot help but be the case because not every artisan is equally gifted.

As the artisan population has grown, there are more and more very skilled wood-crafters out there. As the overall technical level has risen, the fit and finish levels of what is offered has made it difficult to differentiate one artisan from another, especially in technical terms.

What matters to me most, however, is aesthetics. I am jaded because I have seen far too many perfect pipes lacking in beauty. I have seen very few pipes that approach the mastery evidenced in this creation. This is among the two or three most exquisite creations in briar I have ever seen. It fulfills all the criteria I ascribe to a masterpiece, and I do not use this word lightly. I examined this pipe for five days—including photographing it— and I never ceased marveling. Not for one second.

The most remarkable quality of the pipe concerns its movement dynamics. Depending on one’s angle-of-view, the pipe seems variously moving or at rest. From one vantage point, the leafy sea dragon seems asleep, camouflaged by the ocean flora in which it had nestled itself. From other perspectives, it seems captured mid-dart, avoiding some peckish predator.

I can imagine the inner musings of some of you as you read this. You are billiard or dublin smokers. Your idea of an adventurous shape is a bulldog. “That’s weird,” or “That’s not a pipe, that’s a sculpture,” is riffing through your thoughts now, assuming you’ve even read this far. I can relate. I possess fairly conservative pipe-shape preferences, myself. One’s tastes, however, are beside the point. Like Bo Nordh’s ballerina or Ramses, this pipe inverts the landscape. I will never see innovations in shaping the same way again after having interacted with this Leafy Sea Dragon.

Artisan Tonni Nielsen Because I spent so much time with Tonni at the show, I also had hours to talk with him about the pipe: why he made it, what he tried to accomplish, what his challenges were, and how he went about trying to solve them.

I will be frank with you here. Having visually scrubbed this pipe for hours for any flaws or deficits, it became increasingly apparent to me that the principal quality required of this pipe’s creator had to have been insanity. Just the finish-sanding—don’t even consider the shape-sanding—had to have required tens of hours, something that Tonni confirmed. “I thought I was in sanding purgatory,” he quipped in his understated Danish humor.

This pipe was made on spec. As Tonni sweated through its creation, he had no buyer. While he made the pipe with Richard in mind, there were no guarantees. And as the hours mounted while Tonni pushed the envelope—challenging his own limitations as well as the briar’s—the entire effort could have come to nothing with the emergence of a flaw. This sort of endeavor is a high-wire walk in a place where the wind can suddenly gust without warning. It is not for the inexperienced, the gutless, or the artisan who values cost-efficiencies over making great work.



  • APRIL meeting @ Extra Billys….BBQ for all !!!

    Location: EXTRA Billy's
    Address: 1110 Alverser Drive, Midlothian, VA 23113
    Phone: (804) 379-8727
    Website: http://www.extrabillys.com/
    Date & Time: Tuesday, April 15th. about 6:00 p.m. until?

    Meeting Description:

    We have been there many times. The menu offers a good variety of foods for us, with good beers and great barbeque. Check out the website to see all the menu items. We will be on the patio on the right side of the building.

    Directions: Just off Route 60, Midlothian Turnpike, just west of Chesterfield Mall. (MapQuest).


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    MAY Meeting is on MONDAY, May 19 @ Penny Lane Pub

    We used to meet here many years back and have found they maintina an UPSTAIRS smoking room.

    Address: 421 E. Franklin St., Richmond VA 23219
    Phone: (804) 780-1682
    Website: www.pennylanepub.com
    Date & Time: MONDAY, May 19, 2014, about 6:00 p.m. until?

    Meeting Description:
    We have been there numerous times in years past. The menu offers a good variety of foods for us. Check out the website to see all the menu items. We meet in the upstairs smoking room.

    Directions: Corner of 5th and Franklin in Downtown Richmond VA.

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